True Story: How I Battled Depression & Anxiety

True Story: How I Battled Depression & Anxiety

Everyone has a story of how they came to be the person they are today. My name is Brenda and my struggle began in 2007 at the age of fourteen. Before I begin sharing the details, I have to express what I now know but failed to see back then. We all have a mental health that needs to be taken care of as much as our physical health.

 

This fact unbeknownst to many for reasons ranging from the stigma surrounding mental illness to a lack of awareness has resulted in an ever growing prevalence of depression and anxiety in society today.

 

Depression is a chemical imbalance in the brain, a lack of serotonin – what makes a person feel happy. For someone suffering from depression, it can feel as though eternal darkness controls every fibre of your being each and every minute. However, it is also human nature to feel sad – this sadness almost always associated with ‘feeling depressed’ leaving it hard to distinguish the difference between feelings of extreme sadness and depression as a mental illness itself.

 

Mental illness can be hereditary, or a manifestation of an underlying issue never resolved. For me, it all started with an eating disorder that consumed me (the irony) – but regardless of the root cause, I neglected caring for my mental health. It felt as though I was chained to the bottom of an endless hole of impending doom, suicidal thoughts began at 15 alongside self-harming and constant questions of the easiest way to take my own life.

 

Focus and concentration were non-existent, I did badly in high school despite being the daughter of a teacher (hello, stereotypes!) and as years came to pass, I became a four time university drop out. I felt a constant need to escape and so I ran down the path of self-destruction in hopes of finding solace, only to meet my demons face to face. It was a vicious cycle that only I, myself, could break. I was tired of being depressed all the time, I knew something had to be done – but what? How could I escape the gallows of my hopelessness embedded so deep within me? How do I change things? I began to question myself, then I questioned everything. I knew then I had an underlying issue waiting to be discovered, so I started seeking professional help.

 

Addressing your struggles and facing them courageously is magical in its own ways. When you suffer in silence, it’s impossible to take steps towards nurturing your mind. Talking about it not only helps you express what you bottle up inside – it can also encourage others to speak up about their difficulties. We are all only human and it is natural we experience waves of emotions – we feel sad and anxious, happy and content. Negative emotions can stem from almost anything – a lack of confidence, self-worth, or a manifestation of something so deep seeded, buried in our subconscious. No matter what the cause, it’s never the end of the world. It might be tough, can get a lot tougher, but it can also get better.

 

It’s one thing to be sad and feel depressed, but if you’re in a situation where it feels as though a void swallows you whole – it’s probably time to seek professional help, especially if it affects your ability to perform on a day to day basis. The only way out is to take control and do something about it. From talking a stroll, to seeking counselling services. I’d like to think the only person who can really help you is yourself – but before getting to that very point some may need guidance. There’s absolutely no shame in seeking help from a counsellor or a psychologist. Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) are great ways to untangle the root of your struggles.

 

While everyday is still a struggle for me – and I try hard to practice what I preach – one thing I have learned from my battle with mental illness is that I am not alone. On some days, a light shines and I see my battle as an advantage; the very essence of what shaped me into who I am today. We all have the courage to push through walls, climb over them if we have to. The severity of my struggles cannot be compared to another, but everyone suffers – pain is a constant, but so is change.

 

My advice to anyone struggling with any form of mental illness is to learn to take control of your mind, body, and spirit. You don’t have to suffer in silence. Change can happen when we start making conscious decisions in spite of how painful it may be, every choice you make creates a ripple effect – so staying in the same spot will only sink you deeper. I read somewhere that when you feel too depressed to do anything, the best thing to do is the exact opposite. It’s tough, I’ve probably tried it 1 out of 10 times – but it worked wonders and planted within me a seed of hope, and healing grew whenever I watered it.

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She Suffered from Depression & Anxiety and Here’s What She Did About It

She Suffered from Depression & Anxiety and Here’s What She Did About It

A music maestro, Maxy Chan was on her way to building her musical dreams of being an artist in the performing arts industry. Unfortunately, by the age of 21, she was was diagnosed with severe depression and anxiety. Here, she tells her story.

Can you tell us a little bit about your struggle with depression and anxiety?

It was March 2016 when I felt a sudden sharp pain in my chest, and breathing became pretty difficult. At the beginning, I thought it was because I was dehydrated (my parents would say that I’m ‘heaty’), but I also realised that I was beginning to cry a lot… at least 3 times a day when at university. I knew in my head that I should probably consult a counsellor or a Psychotherapist, however, my parents being slightly conservative, refused to bring me to the hospital, in fear that it would affect my future career.

Not long after, when we at the airport sending my brother off to Canada for work, I felt a sudden pain in my chest. I needed to scream aggressively and cry to release the heavy pressure I was feeling. My parents were shocked and they decided to bring me to the temple. However, my condition did not get any better. About a month later, my condition escalated and that was when my parents agreed to letting me make an appointment with Mr. Ko, a Hypnotherapist at Pantai Therapy Centre.

How did you first know you were suffering from depression? And what made you decide to seek help?

Growing up, I was very used to suppressing my feelings. I’m not one to express my emotions, not even to my family. I reckon it was a build up of issues and emotions swept under the carpet since I graduated from primary school – a snowball effect.

I wasn’t sure that I had depression, but I have always been a curious person – always needing to find out why, what and how. So, I decided to seek help to find out what was wrong with me and I am so thankful I did. Unfortunately, many people going through the same struggles as me don’t realise they need help.

What were the symptoms and what did you do about it?

When I started experiencing pain in my chest and started crying constantly, I questioned myself for many months, “what is triggering this?”. That was when I started reading a book of a girl who suffered from depression, and her situation was much more serious.

I would also manifest aggressively, having to scream, shout and jump around in my house. My mom allowed me to express my feelings, but she also made sure to keep all dangerous objects away from my reach.

Factors that trigger mental health disorders are complex. If it were simple, then fixing the problem would be pretty easy, but that isn’t the case. Personally, it was my (lack of) emotional-management habits that triggered my condition. It affected me psychologically, biologically and socially.

How did it affect your daily life?

I would constantly feel very exhausted – almost zombie-like. Nothing could stimulate my emotions, and all I wanted to do is lie in bed. I also couldn’t stop my thoughts from running. It just kept going and going and going.

Upon getting diagnosed in April, I differed two semesters in university, from May up until December because I could not go on with my normal life.

What are some of the dark thoughts you’d get throughout the day?

Every 5 seconds to a minute, I would feel the need to kill or hurt myself. These negative thoughts would not go away.

How long did it take until you felt better?

When I started getting help from a Hypnotherapist, Psychiatrist as well as a Psychotherapist once a week, respectively.

Growing up, I was a go-getter. I dedicated a lot of my time to music and academics, and I neglected the emotional aspect of my life. Through getting treatment from these specialists, I learned to be honest with myself about my emotions. Each time I felt angry or sad, I needed to learn to feel or express.

After about 2 to 3 months of receiving counselling, my Psychotherapist requested for me to see her once every 2 weeks.

So you got help from a Psychotherapist, Psychiatrist and a Hypnotherapist. In your opinion, did all of them help you in your journey towards getting better?

Yes, all three of them helped me in different ways.

Initially, counselling helped me a lot because I was given the opportunity to share a lot of the emotions, struggles and secrets I never revealed before. We went through family therapy, and through that, I learned to share my emotions with my parents. As of now, I am able to do so without having a Psychologist around, so we’ve come a long way!

As for Hypnotherapy, I consulted Mr. Ko who’s based in Pantai and I discovered how my body senses work. My struggle with Insomnia was improved because he taught me to do exercises such as body scan meditation, learning to breathe before sleeping.

Also, a few months after being diagnosed with depression, I started developing OCD symptoms – constantly washing my hands and repeating words. He gave me exercises to work on that too.

Consulting a Psychiatrist was a result of advice from Mr.Ko, because he felt that I needed medication to help control my extreme fluctuating of emotions. For example, I would feel nothing but in a few moments, I become extremely aggressive and out of control. The medications helped balance the chemical imbalance in my brains.

Are you better now?

I am still on medication. I wouldn’t say I am fully recovered but I’ve definitely gotten a lot better. I am now able to resume school, as I started a new semester in January!

On top of that, I’m also very inspired by the book I’ve been reading titled “Chin Ai De Wo” (Dear Me) by Chai Jia Jia. It is about a Taiwanese girl who embraces and accepts her mental health struggles towards the road of recovery.

In your opinion, does a person struggling with depression ever get better?

It is possible, but I’m not sure if a full recovery is possible. An individual can definitely get better, but it would require a combination of contributing factors, such as support from family and friends, receiving therapy and most importantly, altering how you view yourself, and persevering to get better.

What is your advice to someone who’s facing the same problem?

To be honest, when I was first diagnosed with depression and anxiety, many elderly relatives who have experienced it before started advising me on how to overcome the disorder. But I’ve come to realise that each individual’s journey with mental health struggles varies. Different people have different problems and situations, therefore, my equation to solving my struggle may not necessarily be effective on someone else.

But the one advice I can give is to be patient with yourself, give yourself space and time during the journey to recovery. Sometimes, it can get very frustrating because it’s natural for us to want instantaneous recovery. However, it isn’t the case with mental health disorders. The key takeaway from my journey would be – space, time and patience.

Do you think you need help?

If you feel like you’re going through a similar struggle as Maxy and you’re not sure what to do – you can try talking to someone that can help you.

Mr. Ko Teik Yen is a certified Clinical Hypnotherapist specialising in trauma healing & PTSD, chronic/persistent pain & somatic complaints, phobia, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression, burnout, stress and other anxiety related disorders. Based at Pantai Therapy Centre, he has helped many individuals struggling with depression, and he can do the same for you too.

Download Teleme’s mobile app and consult Mr Ko Teik Yen, Psychotherapist and Hypnotherapist today

 

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FACT

Every 3 in 10 adults aged 16 years and above have some sorts of mental health problems (29.2%).

%

of Malaysians will suffer from mental health issues in their lifetime.

Mr. Ko Teik Yen

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Here Are a Few Simple Ways to Overcome Anxiety Everyday

Here Are a Few Simple Ways to Overcome Anxiety Everyday

Anxiety is a feeling of worry, nervousness,
or unease, typically about an imminent event or
something with an uncertain outcome.

 

It is absolutely normal to be anxious at various points of your life, such as prepping for a public speaking competition, pitching to investors, sitting for an exam or attending an interview for a job. It happens to the best of us, really. For example, my hands would tremble and I’d suffer from severe gastritis right before performing in front of an audience – it feels terrible.

What Sets Normal Anxiety Apart from an Anxiety Disorder?

If you find that you’re perpetually anxious and it is affecting your daily function, then it is a problem. You aren’t just worried about one specific issue, but instead, you overthink almost every aspect of everyday life, including, health, work, finances, and so on. The nervousness leads to worries beyond your control and you’re perpetually in fear that something terrible will happen. You most likely have a condition called Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Panic attacks
  • Hyperventilation or rapid breathing or short of breath
  • Excessive worrying, nervousness, restlessness or being tense
  • Social anxiety
  • Phobia
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Trouble sleeping or insomnia
  • Fear or anxiety caused by a particular life experience or event that has happened in the past, indicative of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Sweating profusely
  • Gastrointestinal problems, like acid secretion in your tummy, gas, constipation or diarrhoea.
  • Trembling or shivering
  • Performing certain behaviours over and over again
  • Trouble focusing or thinking clearly about anything other than the issues you’re worried about
  • Sharp chest pains or tightness

 

Flight or Fight Response

Anxiety is usually related to the ‘fight or flight’ response. What that really means is how we are naturally built – our by default biological reaction when we feel threatened. Our body releases cortisol and adrenaline when under threat, which helps you prepare to fight or run. These chemicals released make you feel alert so you can act faster and increases your heartbeat rate, to carry blood quickly to where it’s needed most.

Once danger has passed, your body will then release other hormones that will help your muscles relax, which may potentially cause you to shake and tremble. This auto-response is in built in our body, and we have no control over it.

Panic Attacks

A sudden overwhelming fear that envelops you within seconds. If an individuals struggles with anxiety, it is not uncommon for that person to experience occasional panic attacks – and it usually involves experiencing four or more of the symptoms listed below:

  • Dizzy, giddy, feeling faint or light-headedness
  • Feeling detached from reality
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shaking or trembling
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sweating profusely
  • Sharp chest pains or tightness
  • Choking sensation
  • Fear of losing control or going insane
  • Intense heat or cold
  • Numbness or tingling sensations (Paresthesia)
  • Gastric or nausea
  • Fear of dying

 

8 Things You Can Do Daily To Beat Anxiety

1) Take deep breaths

Breathe in all the way and count up to 6, and as you breath out, count up to 10. This technique has the effect of lengthening and slowing down your breathing. It also helps you release more carbon dioxide, which slows down your heart rate, calms and restores emotional equilibrium

2) Imagine a happy place
Close your eyes, visualise a place of safety and calm. It could be the beach or in your room snuggled within your sheets. Either way, you will slowly, but surely, begin to feel a sense of calm envelop you.

3) Talk about what you’re anxious about
It may seem daunting at first, but it’s good to talk about your fears. Many times, shedding light onto the issue removes its scariness.

4) Reward yourself
When you’ve accomplished a small feat, treat yourself to an ice-cream, or a massage or watch a movie! Do whatever that makes you happy!

5) Practice mindfulness

Don’t fight your experience by telling yourself you shouldn’t be feeling what you’re feeling, but rather, learn to acknowledge and allow yourself to feel. The moment will likely settle down and pass. You can also learn to shift your attention away from your fuzzy thoughts and transition from a thinking mode into a sensing mode. Breathe.

6) Workout
Many of us don’t realise the power in exercise. Daily workout sessions can drastically reduce anxiety levels, and studies have shown that exercising can tip the scales towards living an anxiety-free life. So go ahead and buy yourself that new pair of sports shoes.

7) Go easy
Don’t be too hard on yourself. Sometimes, it’s okay to experience setbacks in life. Don’t give yourself a hard time for it, rather, switch your perspective and give yourself credit for trying. And if you’re up for it, give it another go.

8) Spend time outdoors
Walk your dog or go for a stroll in the park. Being outdoors and breathing in fresh air has a strangely calming effect and can help you with dealing with anxiety.

Talk to Someone Who Can Help You

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Practitioner In The Spotlight: Mr. Ko Teik Yen

Practitioner In The Spotlight: Mr. Ko Teik Yen

Mental Health disorders are real, but we don’t talk about it enough in Malaysia. Many struggle from it, but are either afraid or unsure of where and how to seek help. Today, I speak to Mr. Ko Teik Yen, a certified Hypnotherapist and Mindfulness Therapist & Teacher who helps individuals battle with the disorder.

1) Tell me about yourself

My name is Mr. Ko Teik Yen and I’m a clinical Hypnotherapist and Mindfulness Therapist & Teacher based at Pantai Therapy Centre. I specialise in trauma healing & PTSD, chronic/persistent pain & somatic complaints, phobia, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression, burnout, stress and other anxiety related disorders.

2) Where did you study at?

My background is in Lifescience and I was in the medical pharmaceutical line for 26 years. I decided to transition into the therapy industry and took up a Clinical Hypnotherapy course at London College of Clinical Hypnosis 10 years ago – from Certificate to Diploma and Advance Diploma level. Since then, I have traveled to many countries to further my understanding of human behaviour and Psychotherapy, which includes the University of Oxford Mindfulness Centre; Centre of Mindfulness, University of Massachusetts Medical School and many others. About two years ago, a few of us started a practice at Pantai Kuala Lumpur.

3) Can you tell me a little bit about Mental Health issues and what are some of the causes?

I do not view mental illness as purely a sickness or disease. Human beings are constantly in search for purpose and are constantly pressured to achieve results. We are complex beings and as we search for new purpose, we may get stuck. How we used to approach certain things may sometimes not work anymore, prodding us to learn to deal with things differently. Mental disorder is like an awakening, to point us towards the direction of where and what has gone wrong.

4) Why did you choose to pursue Psychotherapy and Hypnotherapy?

The pharmaceutical industry focuses a lot on medicine, but I noticed it was only a small part of healthcare. You don’t get to explore the psychology and social aspects of the complex human body. However, within Psychology, you are able to touch on the conscious and subconscious mind, as well as the emotional aspects. There is a much greater interest within me to understand the bio-psycho-social aspects – to manage illnesses and diseases, which are not restricted to just antibiotics and medication.

5) Can you explain what is Psychotherapy and Hypnotherapy?

Essentially, Psychology is the study of human behavior and Psychotherapy and Hypnotherapy sits under its umbrella. They are two of the many different ways used to helping people with their thoughts and emotions.

  • Psychotherapy
    The use many types of psychological techniques, such as communicating with a Psychologist, Psychiatrist or a Counsellor.
  • Hypnotherapy
    Deals directly with an individual’s subconscious mind by inducing him/her to enter a state of relaxation and calm, with their permission. With that, they are able to go back to the past and address underlying issues. When the mind is more open, flexible and a little distant from the problems at hand, they are able to look at it differently.

A combination of Hypnotherapy and Mindfulness intervention is probably the most efficient way to address symptoms of depression and anxiety because it deals with the subconscious thought processes, which is usually the cause of many people’s problems. One session can last for 60 to 90 minutes.

6) Describe your experience thus far as a Hypnotherapist

I have to say, it has been a very satisfying and fulfilling journey, being able to help others become better versions of themselves.

7) Describe one or more memorable patient you’ve attended to, and how you’ve managed to help him/her?

I’ve handled a case of a 46-year old depressed patient on medication. Her battle with the disorder began when she was 19, and from time to time, she would relapse and get out of control. She was referred to me by a Psychiatrist, and I’m very happy to say that she is now learning how to handle her emotions better. Instead of relying on just medication and adjusting the dosages, she is now finally able to deal with her emotions more effectively. In fact, she’s started to look for a job, after so many years!

There is this other 21-year old patient whom is a very talented musician. Classified as perfect pitch at the tender age of 4, she was offered a scholarship by a university to pursue music. However, she unfortunately succumbed to depression last April which led to a hiatus from school and music. She received treatment from me and by November, she started playing the piano again. I’m so glad to see her rebuild her life and not let her talent go to waste.

8) Do you treat only a specific age group?

As long as the individual is not too young. Patients from 10 and above are fine.

 

9) What is the one thing that makes you want to get up in the morning to go to work?

Doing what I’m passionate about! I’m driven to help individuals live fulfilling lives. One of my career goals is to help a patient, but in more ways than just getting rid and dealing with symptoms. I want to help my patients deal with the underlying issues – what is driving the anger, anxiety and depression.

10) Once someone has been diagnosed with a mental illness, can he/she get better again?

Yes, it’s definitely possible with the right management and approach – from medication, to managing the psychological and social aspects.

11) How does one even begin to tell if he/she is suffering from depression/anxiety etc?

With anxiety, you can almost always identify the symptoms. You’re constantly –

  • Constantly anxious
  • Heart keeps pounding
  • Perpetually tense and restless
  • Insomnia
  • Phobias develop
  • Repetitive panic attacks
  • Anger is triggered by almost anything

As for depression, you’ll notice –

  • Lost of interest towards things and activities you used to love
  • Apathetic towards life
  • Zero drive and energy
  • Constantly feel that there’s no purpose in life

There is also this thing called mask depression whereby depressed/anxious patients are extremely high-functioning. Some of them are very good at suppressing and controlling their emotions. However, they manifest it in other forms like binge drinking alcohol, smoking or even cardiovascular related diseases.

12) Do you treat sleeping problems?

Yes. Insomnia is a symptom of anxiety, depression or both. It can be a result of trauma. I will teach techniques to relax that will help the patient sleep better. Sleeping pills are not a long term solution.

13) When should someone who is feeling depressed decide to seek help?

At the point the disorder affects your function. Otherwise, if they can reach out to their support system (friends and family) and try to find some kind of way to balance their life in terms of recreation to relax, before the condition escalates.

14) What treatment options are available?

If the condition is mild and moderate, then I’d recommend going for the non-medication approach first – which includes various forms of Psychotherapy and Hypnotherapy, as well as learning how to regulate our emotions, our thoughts and stabilise our focus of attention.

However, if the case is serious, these individuals would usually need medication to help them stabilise their condition – therefore a Psychiatrist would be the perfect go-to person.

15) What is the difference between various mental health professions?

  • HypnotherapistDeals directly with an individual’s subconscious mind. Induce him/her to enter a state of relaxation and calm, with their permission. No medication prescription.
  • Psychotherapist – Focus extensively on Psychotherapy. Treat emotional and mental suffering in patients behavioral intervention. No medication prescription.
  • Psychiatrist – Spend much of their time with patients on medication management as a course of treatment.
  • CounsellorFocus on patient’s concerns and difficulties. Teach how to assist individuals develop an understanding about themselves to make changes in their lives. No medication prescription.

 

To talk to him online now!

Download Teleme’s mobile app and consult Mr Ko Teik Yen, Psychotherapist and Hypnotherapist

 

Mr. Ko Teik Yen

Psychotherapy & Hypnotherapy

15 Signs Of Depression You Should Be Aware Of

15 Signs Of Depression You Should Be Aware Of

 

Depression is a feeling of severe despondency and dejection.

 

The Ministry of Health in Malaysia has forecasted that depression will be a major mental health illness suffered by Malaysians by the year 2020.

“According to a research done by the association on the prevalence of depression amongst Malaysians, there has been a 50 percent surge of patients with depression from 2011 to 2015. The National Health and Morbidity Survey indicated that 29% of Malaysians suffer from depression and anxiety, compared to only 12% in the year 2011.”

“The increasing statistics is extremely alarming as it is equivalent to one third of the population.”

I’ve come to realise one thing, we don’t talk enough about mental health illnesses here in Malaysia. Therefore, I thought of getting the ball rollin’ and address the elephant in the room. It’s about time we shed some light onto the issue that is fast becoming a major problem within our community.

Depression is a tricky situation because it is not unusual for us to feel down-in-the-dumps when an upsetting or disappointing event takes place in our lives, such as a break-up or losing a job. It is absolutely normal to go through the motions of sadness, but it’s important to know that those feelings will eventually fade.

However, if you’re noticing that the negativity isn’t leaving, then it could be a telltale sign of onset depression.The National Institute of Mental Health describes a major depressive episode as “a period of two weeks or longer during which there is either depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure, and at least four other symptoms that reflect a change in functioning, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, and self-image.” Here are some of the most common symptoms that point to the presence of depression:

Symptoms for Depression

Psychological Symptoms

  • Unexplained and prolonged feelings of sadness, loneliness and misery that can lasts for weeks.
  • Little or no interest in doing things you once loved and enjoyed. All you want to do is nothing.
  • Have thoughts such as “you are better of dead”, or you think of hurting yourself.
  • Can’t seem to function very well through the day due to poor concentration, which leads to difficulties making plans or decisions.
  • Perpetually feeling guilty, bad and unworthy.
  • Unexplained aches and pains.
  • Withdrawing from people.
  • Substance abuse.
  • Random anger outbursts.

Physical Symptoms

  • Lost of appetite which leads to weight loss.
  • Constantly feeling lethargic and exhausted, even when not physically active.
  • Disinterested in sex.
  • You struggle to fall asleep and end up staying awake for hours on end. (Some individuals may actually sleep a lot more than usual)
  • Slowed activity and speech.
  • Trouble remembering.

*You will need to exhibit at least five of the above symptoms to be suffering a depressive disorder.

The common misconception of individuals struggling with depression is that they can “snap out of it”. But that is far from the truth. What we need to first realise is depression isn’t “in your head”, “just a phase” or imaginary. Depressive disorder is a serious disorder caused by changes in hormonal levels, chemical imbalance in the brain, hereditary genetics, certain medical conditions, difficult life circumstances, stress and/or grief.

Depression affects one in ten men and one in five women worldwide. It does not discriminate as it can happen to just about anyone.

10 Things You Can Daily To Beat Depression

  • Make yourself do something fun, even if you don’t feel like it.
  • Reach out or talk to your loved ones – family and friends.
  • Soak up the sun – go out and take a stroll during the daytime.
  • Counter all negative thoughts.
  • List down your accomplishments.
  • Write down each ‘joy’ you’ve experienced in the day.
  • Go for a swim.
  • Exercise, exercise, exercise.
  • Cut down on alcohol.
  • Start eating healthily. Try to avoid sugar and gluten.

While you can do all of the above to help you manage the disorder, it is very advisable to have the disease diagnosed and treated. Mental health disorders are treated most effectively in their earliest stages when the symptoms are still mild.

And let’s talk about stigma surrounding mental health services. Firstly, stigma is men made. We can do without it and never let it discourage you from seeking help. Just like how you should see a specialist if you have a broken leg, in the same way, it is crucial that you see a professional when dealing with a mental health issue.

Want To Get Help?

If you feel like you are currently suffering from at least 5 or more of the symptoms listed above, and you’re not sure what to do – you can try talking to a licensed psychologist who can help you.

Source: The Malay Mail Online

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%

Did you know that 75% of doctor visits can actually be treated online?

 Dr. Khairi Rahman

Dr. Khairi Rahman

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Ms. Usha Ponnudurai

Ms. Usha Ponnudurai

Psychologist

 

Ms Sarah Zehan

Ms Sarah Zehan

Psychologist

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